Expert Advice

Angela Dowden

Expert Advice

Mrs Margaret Almond asks – Please can you tell me where I can purchase Canderel Stevia?
Canderel Stevia is available for purchase in most major grocery stores.
Maureen Walker asks – I have a recipe which uses Canderel (85 grams) would the equivalent castor sugar be 850 grams based on the details shown below, i.e. divide ordinary sugar required by 10, so one would assume to multiply Canderel required by 10?
Yes this is correct. You can also use Canderel spoon for spoon in replace of sugar if you prefer.
Melanie, Casey, Gillian & Penny ask – Does either Canderel Ideal for Baking or Stevia contain aspartame?
No, Canderel Ideal for Baking is made from Sucralose and Canderel Stevia is made from Stevia. Only original Canderel contains Aspartame.
Judith & M. Masoudi ask – Is Canderel okay for people with diabetes?
Yes. Canderel does not affect glucose or insulin levels. Thanks to Canderel, people with diabetes can choose from a wider variety of foods and drinks, making it easier to follow nutritional recommendations. Canderel allows diabetics the freedom to enjoy a low calorie alternative to sugar without compromising on taste.
Ann Johnson asks – Please can you tell me where I can purchase Canderel Vanilla?
Unfortunately Canderel Vanilla sticks are no longer available for purchase in the UK.
Margaret Maher asks- I would like to start using Canderel for all my cake making can you help please?
In the Cakes & Bakes sections of the Canderel Kitchen you will find a great selection of Canderel cakes that are calorie counted, so you can choose the ones that best fit into your diet. If you have any of your own favourite recipes, you can usually make a low sugar version by using Canderel granular, spoon for spoon, in place of sugar, or if you’re weighing out, divide the sugar quantity by ten.
Irene Horton asks – How much Canderel will I use for cake baking in place of say 2oz of caster sugar?
In weight terms divide the sugar quantity by 10. So, the equivalent amount of Canderel to 2oz of caster sugar would be 0.2oz.
Mpheme asks – Is eating Canderel the same as using sugar?
Sugar contains 20 calories per teaspoon and Canderel contains only 2, meaning Canderel is the ideal way to get the sweet taste of sugar for fewer calories. Replacing the sugar in recipes with Canderel couldn’t be easier, but you do need to choose the right product for the best effect. For sprinkling or dusting, the original Canderel is ideal for adding sweetness to your dishes. When cooking and baking try Canderel Ideal for Baking as it is more resilient at higher temperatures. Simply use Original Canderel or Canderel Ideal for Baking granular spoon for spoon in place of sugar in many of your favourite dishes or if you’re weighing it out, divide the sugar quantity by ten. For example if the recipe calls for 250 grams of sugar you will need 25g of Canderel.
Lieze Grobbelaar asks – I am 24 years old, I have been a diabetic (insulin dependent) for 14 years. I consume roughly 10 – 15 sachets Canderel per day. Are there any long term negative effects it can cause? And can one consume TOO much Canderel?
It is almost impossible to use too much Canderel, and there is no possibility of this occurring even if a person’s daily diet includes several cups of sweetened tea, plus some Canderel-sweetened baked goods or treats. There is no defined acceptable daily intake (ADI) for Canderel, but EU Scientific Committee for Food has set an Acceptable Daily Intake (ADI). The ADI for aspartame is 40mg/kg of body weight and for Ace-K 15 mg/kg. So, for example, a person weighing 70kg could consume 154 Canderel Tablets per day, every day, throughout life without exceeding the ADI. For Steviol Glycosides, expressed as steviol equivalent, of 4 mg/kg of body weight per day. For an adult weighing 70 kgs can safety consume below amounts everyday for the whole life. Canderel Stevia tablets: 53 tablets a day. Canderel Stevia granular: 76 teaspoons a day.
Claire asks – Can Canderel cause diarrhoea?
None of the ingredients found in Canderel sweeteners are associated with known diarrhoea effects (unlike some sweeteners that contain sorbitol for example).
Dot Sharman asks – I’m with Slimming World and some recipes contain a large quantity of Canderel eg: 7 tablespoonfuls for a batch of 12 cakes. As the cakes are small and contain no fat the attraction is to eat several. Can this be harmful?
It is almost impossible to use too much Canderel, and there is no possibility of this occurring even if a person’s daily diet includes several cups of sweetened tea, plus some Canderel-sweetened baked goods or treats.
Michele asks – Can I make a meringue with Canderel?
I’m pleased to say that it is possible to make meringue with Canderel, simply replace the sugar in your meringue recipe with Canderel original or Canderel Ideal for Baking Granules. The rule is to use 50g sugar per egg used (so 4 eggs would require 200g sugar). However you then need to convert this quantity for Canderel, so need to divide this by 10 – so use 20g Canderel.
Julie asks – How much sweetener does a person need to eat before it has an effect on their sugar levels and how many grams of carbs is in a teaspoon, for example?
The level of carbohydrate in a teaspoon of Canderel (any variety) is very low (only 0.47g per tablespoon), so you would need to consume large amounts to have any impact on your blood sugar levels at all. To supply a comparison, one slice of bread has 18g of carbohydrate. Don’t forget however that when Canderel is used as a sweetener in baked goods, the flour will be contributing quite a bit of carbohydrate, which must be taken into account if you’re measuring the amount you consume.
Maureen asks – Is using this bad for my health?
No, you can use Canderel without any worries! That’s because the various sweeteners that are contained in the three Canderel brands (aspartame in original Canderel, sucralose in Canderel Ideal for Baking and stevia in Canderel Sweetness from a Leaf) have all been widely tested by toxicity committees in many different countries. In the case of aspartame, the sweetener and its breakdown products have been a matter of extensive investigation for more than 30 years – including clinical research, intake and epidemiological studies and post-marketing surveillance. Sucralose is a newer sweetener, but has also been accepted by several national and international food safety regulatory bodies, including the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), Joint Food and Agriculture Organization / World Health Organisation Expert Committee on Food Additives and European Union’s Scientific Committee on Food. Stevia is the newest sweetener to the market and originates from Stevia Rebaudiana, a herb from the Chrysanthemum family. It too has also been rigorously tested before coming to market! Which sweetener you choose is down to your individual preference, but I hope you are reassured that they are all safe to consume.
Ellen Maria Mathus asks – How many Canderel sachets must I use in my cup of tea?
How many Canderel sachets you use in your drinks is entirely up to you and depends on how sweet you like to have your tea! But as a guide, each sachet is the equivalent in sweetness to one teaspoon of sugar, so hopefully this will help you make the correct judgement.
Diana Cairns says – I am a Type 2 Diabetic. When eating out I often find it difficult to get ingredients and cooking methods.
This can pose a problem, but if your diabetes is well controlled and you choose familiar foods, you should usually be able to eat out without too much worry. The main issue is trying to avoid the temptation to eat more than you normally would when a large portion is placed in front of you! In conjunction with a diabetes nurse specialist you should be able to have a good feel for how much carbohydrate you can eat, and it’s important to bear this in mind when dishes include pasta, rice or potato, or when the breadbasket is brought to your table! Making sure you order some vegetables or a salad and having a meal with a decent amount of protein (chicken, lean meat or fish) will also help to make sure the impact on your blood sugar is less. Desserts can obviously be very high in sugar and something like cheese and biscuits may be a better option (but only if you haven’t already eaten more than you should)!
Maureen asks – Can I make Pavlova with Canderel?
Yes, I’m pleased to say that you can. To make the pavlova, simply replace the sugar in your meringue recipe with Canderel Ideal for Baking Granules. The general rule is to use 50g sugar per egg used (so 4 eggs would require 200g sugar). However you then need to divide this quantity by ten for Canderel Ideal for Baking, i.e. for four eggs, use 20g of the sweetener.
Ibrahim asks – I have never used your product but I want to know if a smoker can use it?
Yes, it is perfectly safe to use any Canderel product if you are a smoker.
Sarah asks – Does Canderel contain fructose?
No, Canderel does not contain fructose. In all three cases (original Canderel, Canderel Ideal for Baking and Canderel Stevia) the sweetener is dispersed in a base of maltodextrin, which is a type of longer chain carbohydrate made up of several glucose (not fructose) molecules joined together.
Evelyne asks – Is there salt in Canderel Stevia, as I am on a salt free diet?
No, there is no salt in Canderel Stevia, or any of the Canderel products. So they are all suitable for you on a no added salt diet.
D Ackers says – I’m interested in recipes for diabetic people who also have a Gluten allergy. I find it hard to alternate the Canderel for the sugar and the gluten free flour for the flour – sometimes the recipe works like a charm and other times disaster.
I can sympathise and unfortunately there aren’t any rules to follow here – it really is a case of trial and error to see which recipes work (and those that don’t!) with both the sugar and the flour substituted. Of course when you are making your own treat, it might be better to choose those that don’t actually include flour – things like meringue, cornflake cakes and flour-free brownies for example.